Transition to school: a collaborative effort

Why is the process of transitioning to school from early childhood education so important? How can educators, families, schools and community members collaboratively develop useful and meaningful strategies to help children? Why is this collaboration essential?

This month on We Hear You, we look at the latest OECD Starting Strong V report on this transition and explore what a quality transition to school looks like.

The latest OECD Starting Strong V report – Transitions from Early Childhood Education and Care to Primary Education – recognises transition to school as an integral component of quality educational provision. It highlights that a commitment to equity and excellence in the development of transition programs, evident in the engagement of children, families, professionals, educators and community members, is key to developing appropriate and meaningful approaches.

The report also acknowledges the central role of relationships in positive transitions and opportunities for those involved in building and maintaining these relationships. The importance of community engagement in supporting effective transitions is also recognised. The report also notes ‘the benefits of early learning can fade during the first years of primary school if the transitions between early childhood education and care and primary schooling are not well-prepared, or if continuity in quality is not ensured’ (p. 5).

This has major implications for school and early childhood education and care (ECEC) sectors, if the benefits of continuity of education and development for children are to be realised. Both have a responsibility of working collaboratively to ensure a smooth transition to schools and ensure our schools and early childhood services are responsive to individual children and their families.

The OECD report identifies findings from international research that the following key indicators support successful transitions (p. 23):

  • shared views between early childhood education and care and schools on transitioning
  • alignment and balance between what and how children learn in early childhood education and care and primary school (i.e. curriculum and pedagogical practices)
  • shared understandings on individual differences and how each child learns differently
  • collaborative practices between preschool and primary school teachers, such as sharing written information on child development and children’s experiences
  • alignment of pedagogical understanding of preschool and primary school teachers through training
  • alignment of working conditions of preschools and primary school teachers
  • flexibility and responsiveness to individual communities, families and children
  • collaboration among staff, managers, parents and the community based on reciprocal communication, inclusivity, mutual trust and respect.

The report also highlights some challenges that are worthy of consideration including:

  • lack of coherence across regions in transition approaches, for example education and care services and schools with different approaches across regions may result in inconsistent quality
  • difficulty engaging all actors, for example the communication about transition approaches that schools, early childhood education and care services and communities receive may be different
  • weak collaboration amongst stakeholders (is this a priority for all parties and has the transition process been adequately resourced?)
  • inequity in transitions, for example children and families may require additional support.

The importance of smooth, collaborative transitions that support continuity of learning is recognised as a key concept of Quality Area 6 – Collaborative Partnerships with Families and Communities in the revised National Quality Standard (NQS). This is part of the changes to the National Quality Framework agreed by Education Ministers earlier this year.

With the implementation of the revised NQS from 1 February 2018, it may be timely to undertake a self-assessment against the revised standards, considering your service’s approach to supporting children’s transition to formal schooling and school age education and care. How does your service approach fare against the success indicators highlighted above? What enhancement strategies could be included in your Quality Improvement Plan (QIP)?

When we think about collaboration between education and care services, schools, school age care and communities as an ideal opportunity to improve lifelong outcomes for children, we should also consider it an exciting and productive way for communities to work together as agents of change. This collaboration presents an opportunity for your service to demonstrate how you meet or exceed the NQS.

The current Guide to the National Quality Standard is a useful resource to review when thinking about the roles that each of the key stakeholders might play. Some examples could include:

  • Early childhood education and care services:
    • sharing strategies that were effective in preparing children and families to transition to your service
    • sharing information with parents/carers and other services children may be attending  to support them  in preparing to  transition to school or  school age care
    • collaboratively developing coherent goals and expectations about learning, and understanding the links between the approved learning frameworks and the Australian Curriculum
    • understanding the AEDC data for the community
  • School age education and care services:
    • seeking out connections with early childhood services, local schools and families
    • understanding the AEDC data for the community
  • Schools:
    • drawing on information from education and care services (such as transition statements) to gain an understanding of each child’s strengths, history, culture and identity
    • collaboratively developing coherent goals and expectations about learning, and understanding the links between the Australian Curriculum and the approved learning frameworks
    • understanding the AEDC data for the community
    • engaging in respectful, collaborative partnerships and networks to build understanding and knowledge
  • Community:
    • supporting an inclusive environment where services and agencies, cultural groups and community elders are welcomed and involved in supporting children’s effective transitions from home to early childhood and onto school.

What opportunities exist for your service, as a key stakeholder, to take the initiative in improving connections or developing/enhancing the procedure for transitioning children to formal schooling?

In your quality improvement planning processes, you might consider strategies to build and maintain respectful, collaborative partnerships to support continuity of learning and effective transitions.

Further reading and resources                                       

ACECQA – Approved Learning Frameworks

Belonging, Being and Becoming: The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia

My Time, Our Place: Framework for School Age Care in Australia 

Educators’ Guide to the Early Years Learning Framework

Educators’ Guide to the Framework for School Age Care

ACECQA National Educational Leader – Transition to School

Australian Government Department of Education – Continuity of Learning: A resource to support effective transition to school and school age care

Early Childhood Australia and Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority – Foundations for learning: Relationships between the Early Years Learning Framework and the Australian Curriculum

OECD – Starting Strong 2017: Key OECD Indicators on Early Childhood Education and Care

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